Newest PS3 hardware to remove HD support over component cables


Popular news site Kotaku posted the picture above, which represents a memo leaked from a Gamestop retailer. The memo suggests that the newest PS3 hardware “referred to as the PS3 K chassis” will remove HD support over component cables and instead require users to use an HDMI connection. According to another popular gaming forum site Neogaf the main reason behind this is:

the recent mandate by the Advanced Access Content System (AACS) which requires any officially licensed Blu-ray player manufactured after December 31, 2010 must limit HD support to digital output only.

Sony have not released any official statement regarding the matter.


Written by: Cheeto - News Contributor


  1. #1 by FrogmanTM on July 13th, 2011 [ 7058 Points ]

    Apparently, this is only partially correct. According to ArsTechnica, SONY clarified this by stating:

    “The new CECH-3000 series PS3 requires HDMI only for BD movie output in HD, in compliance with AACS standards,” Sony told Ars. “PS3 continues to support component output for HD gaming and streaming content.”

    http://arstechnica.com/gaming/news/2011/07/sony-explains-new-ps3-hdmi-required-for-hd-video-only-not-games.ars

  2. #2 by Pedro on July 13th, 2011 [ 39949 Points ]

    Does this really have any impact ?

    I mean, is there any TV that supports HD resolution and does not have a HDMI entrance?

  3. #3 by premiersoupir on July 13th, 2011 [ 17020 Points ]

    This is totally hilarious. AACS should have thrown up its hands and beat a shamefaced retreat when blu-ray copy protections were hacked on release, even as Sony-funded tech analysts were making the absurd (and already demonstrably false!) claim that blu-ray tech would be unhackable for ten years! (http://hd.engadget.com/2007/07/10/analyst-claims-bd-is-impenetrable-for-ten-years-hackers-chuckl/). The first version of AnyDVD that supported Blu-ray decryption was released in March ’07 — a few months before the aforementioned infamous claims about AACS security.

  4. #4 by Oly on July 13th, 2011 [ 131925 Points ]

    If it was completely true, which seems like it is only for BluRays, the only problem I see with it is removing the ability to use a video capture device, like the HDPVR which doesn’t accept HDMI for some stupid reason 8-)

  5. #5 by Jay on July 13th, 2011 [ 83111 Points ]

    Personally I don’t think it is surprising at all and is likely to refer to 1080P only, as 720P on component is standard (and is still technically HD). 1080P is possible through Component, but that would depend on the display, and a few of them don’t necessarily support 1080P through component anyway

  6. #6 by Jason on July 13th, 2011 [ 27516 Points ]

    they are trying to get away from fake xbox 360 hd and show people how to really get a solid hd pictured whioch is hdmi. Yes pedro this will hurt alot of people who cant afford hd tvs but have component on their out dated televisions. I didnt get had until last year so I can relate. Its hard to save up the money for these tvs

  7. #7 by premiersoupir on July 13th, 2011 [ 17020 Points ]

    I’m not sure that making the XBox look bad is exactly the motivation, @Jason. See #1 above: HDMI is only being required for blu-ray output, not for gaming, and it sounds like this is a move mandated by AACS standards, which have still not settled on the definitive guidelines for blu-ray structure. (In other words, all of this should have been sorted out years ago, as far as I’m concerned.) I love my PS3, but I really wish that HD-DVD had won the last media war. May soon be a moot point, anyway, as we’re rapidly accelerating away from physical media for video content.

  8. #8 by CHEETO on July 13th, 2011

    FrogmanTM: Apparently, this is only partially correct. According to ArsTechnica, SONY clarified this by stating:“The new CECH-3000 series PS3 requires HDMI only for BD movie output in HD, in compliance with AACS standards,” Sony told Ars. “PS3 continues to support component output for HD gaming and streaming content.”http://arstechnica.com/gaming/news/2011/07/sony-explains-new-ps3-hdmi-required-for-hd-video-only-not-games.ars  

    That is actually true, This post was supposed to be out yesterday lol Time differences! I don’t know what to make of this, The PS3 may be the first system to get worse over time – the 60GB model is still by far and away the best version …

  9. #9 by Pedro on July 13th, 2011 [ 39949 Points ]

    Jason: they are trying to get away from fake xbox 360 hd and show people how to really get a solid hd pictured whioch is hdmi. Yes pedro this will hurt alot of people who cant afford hd tvs but have component on their out dated televisions. I didnt get had until last year so I can relate. Its hard to save up the money for these tvs  

    Jason, until last year I also didn’t have a HDTV however, my old tube TV didn’t support HD video anyway as most games were terribly distorted in it.

    That’s what my question is, does tube TVs support HD resolution? Because it’s not like they’re prohibiting use of component cable, they’re only limiting it’s use with HDTV which already support HDMI cables.

    I don’t, I’m confused…

  10. #10 by Darklurkr23 on July 13th, 2011 [ 20326 Points ]

    God more crap Sony is taking away when we’re paying for a full system. To hell with all the memory, and leave classic parts in the damn machine.

  11. #11 by Jay on July 13th, 2011 [ 83111 Points ]

    Pedro: Jason, until last year I also didn’t have a HDTV however, my old tube TV didn’t support HD video anyway as most games were terribly distorted in it.

    That’s what my question is, does tube TVs support HD resolution? Because it’s not like they’re prohibiting use of component cable, they’re only limiting it’s use with HDTV which already support HDMI cables.

    I don’t, I’m confused…

    Near the end of the CRT television, they did support HD outputs through both component (up to 720P/1080i) and HDMI (which has very limited 1080P support on those televisions, usually reserved for TVs with a 32 inch or larger screen); rear projection CRTs had quite a few models that had 1080P support, but now it is very hard to find CRT televisions anyway. The TV I had before this one was a 27 inch 720p/1080i Sony (through both component and HDMI, but only v1.2), and the picture was great. It was just a 4:3, so with HD sources, I would have the black bars on the top and bottom, as I bought that TV before widescreen was the standard dimension (and LCDs and plasmas were just starting to come down in price), but the picture was still crystal clear.

    To quickly answer your question, though, it’s all about pixel density. Technically, you can get a CRT to have that 1920×1080 (2,073,600 pixels). CRT televisions can potentially have better picture quality than LCD and Plasma, but the weight required for tube TVs was the reason why you don’t see many of them anymore since LCDs and plasmas are so cheaply produced now and take up a lot less material to save companies money, and that also trickles down to the consumer as it reduces weight and you don’t need a thick stand to house your TV, making wall mounting feasible


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